Precious Metals in the News

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PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2015 6:52 pm
Repatriation Of Gold From Fed Suggests Historic Vote Of No Confidence
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-05-0 ... confidence

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Note the above chart is not accurate, because not long after the chart was published, the US Fed and Germany declared that the Fed was unable to repatriate the amount of gold on a schedule that Germany wanted. Why? No one knows. Anyway, they'll be getting less of their gold back.

Several countries in the world parked up to 50% or more of their physical gold reserves with the US Federal Reserve based in New York City (and another percentage in London, UK). For Europeans, it started with the global Bretton Woods monetary treaty and the fear of war with the Soviets, both in the mid-20th century.

In the 21st century, with the advent of massive money-printing and paper-based financial devices gone haywire, suddenly a lot of countries want their gold audited, or more importantly repatriated.

Over the last few years, countries including, but not limited to, Germany, the Netherlands, France, Belgium, Austria, Poland, Ecuador, Finland, Switzerland, Venezuela, and Romania have either formally requested repatriation of their gold or are in discussions with the Fed about it.


The Fed has been bluntly resistant to sending the gold of foreign nations back. During all the time which the Fed had the foreign gold, the private bank used it for loans, leases, and apparently leveraging techniques to depress the global gold spot price in the last few years.

There’s evidence that, in recent years, the Fed has been leveraging some of its foreign gold holdings to lower skyrocketing gold prices as part of its grand scheme to “engineer” an economic recovery from the 2008 Financial Crisis. This is to be expected. After all, the Fed has spent the past 7 years throwing everything but the kitchen sink at the chronically-ill American economy and its epidemic of long-term unemployment and underemployment: It’s bailed out the Too Big to Fail banks to the tune of $14 trillion. It’s printed more than $4.2 trillion. It’s crushed down interest rates to zero and has kept them there. Naturally, the good people at the Eccles Building would include leveraging their foreign gold holdings in their campaign to prop up the economy. After all, high gold prices are a proxy for fears about the future of the economy, and prices reached generational highs in late summer 2011–3.5 years into the Fed’s post-crisis “recovery”.


So, if the Fed has been leveraging its foreign gold holdings in order to lower the price of bullion, it’s quite possible that it simply doesn’t have in its possession the amount of foreign gold it should. Again, this isn’t a stretch. In fact, it’s Occam’s Razor: Hypothecation is a common practice in the precious metals world, and, recently, the Fed has been flat-out refusing foreign nations from auditing their gold and will only return large holdings on installment plans.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/ ... ts-results

Pretty suspicious behavior, particularly given the long history of foreign nations continuing to store their gold in Fed vaults during times in which repatriation would have made more sense.


So we're led to believe by the financial gurus of our time, in and out of government, that gold is just a barbaric relic of the past. But the US Federal Reserve, the monetary chieftain of the entire economy and money itself, is acting exactly the opposite of a gold-hater. Against the wishes of the rightful foreign owners, The Fed is jealously, greedily hoarding a large portion of the world's gold supply, and only returning the stuff in bits and pieces.

There could be a few reasons why the Fed is acting like a gold hoarder and bully.

1. It's reminding the world not to screw around with gold, even if it's theirs. The US fiat dollar must continue to be the world's #1 source and medium of monetary wealth, even if it really isn't, and it's just counterfeited paper based on nothing but the threat of military attack. The Fed will give up the US dollar as numero uno at a time of its choosing and no later. It can't hand back all the gold any old time so that those stashes can be used as the anchors for new non-American systems.

and/or

2. The Fed is willing to hand back the gold, just as soon as it stops playing shell games and Ponzi schemes with it. Then it can be repatriated in larger or full installments. It may take years and years, even decades, with the gold leveraged on the balance sheets as collateral for trillions in new dollars.

and/or

3. The Fed's stash of foreign gold will be 1 major anchor point for when the US dollar dies and some new kind of global arrangement is made. The average lifespan of a fiat paper currency is 40 years. Bretton Woods died in 1971. We're overdue by 4 years. Something major is going to happen in the monetary world, publicly or secretly, in the next 5-10 years.


Whatever the case, given that the Fed is hoarding and virtually declining to give back, and so many of the original owners are demanding, we have to assume that gold is highly desired by the people managing the planet's money system. All the talk about how it's an increasingly unwanted metal is false.
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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2015 8:30 pm
Next up... Austria

Austria to repatriate large gold reserves from Britain
http://www.afp.com/en/news/austria-repa ... es-britain

Announced today, May 28

Vienna confirmed it would begin to gradually repatriate 92.4 tonnes this summer. A further 47.6 tonnes will be transferred from Britain to Switzerland.


Interesting how some countries are getting more concerned about getting their gold back, while others are just bent on accumulating more.

There's a lot of rumours out there about how something big is going to happen before the end of this year. If I were a central banker or treasury bureaucrat from some little country, I would be doing anything to pile up more gold as wealth insurance (and possibly as a bargaining chip for new monetary changes potentially hitting).
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PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2015 2:27 pm
Ukraine's gold has vanished

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-11-1 ... -gold-gone
http://www.globalresearch.ca/ukraines-g ... ve/5373446
http://rt.com/business/207347-ukraine-g ... rves-gone/

http://newswire-24.com/2014/03/07/4827/

The Western-induced revolution left Ukraine bankrupt, which is what the West is really good at doing to poorer countries. It wasn't that hard because the country had been prey to kleptocrats (either pro-Russia or pro-West) for decades. In the end, Ukraine could not properly support its currency and pay for basic government services. Apparently some Western bankers were nice enough to buy all of Ukraine's gold reserves in one foul swoop (literally loading it all on a plane and flying away with it in the middle of the night). In return, the financial helpers gave Ukraine some funny money and debt in return.

Ukraine's problems naturally got worse and the funny money hasn't help that much as its troubles persist (by design). So the West has Ukraine's gold and has the country currently under its power via debt, which is not meant to be paid off but 'serviced' instead. At least they're giving Ukraine guns to continue the West's proxy war vs Russia, which in turn is using its proxies in Ukraine to counter the West. If I were Ukrainian, I'd consider leaving the country asap. The place has been globalized (raided and indentured into debt/war slavery).

Without any gold, and with only reliance from foreign powers, a country arguably is no longer sovereign and independent. Its currency is no better than toilet paper.
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PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2015 3:01 pm
Pakistan refuses to sell its gold despite pressure from the IMF
http://tribune.com.pk/story/688588/turn ... mf-report/

Pakistan has long been under pressure due to its economic woes.

The International Monetary Fund is the public, globalist face of a bunch of Western-orientated banks (headquartered mainly in the USA, Europe, and Japan), as well as economic manipulators doing Washington DC's bidding. The IMF wants Pakistan's 2 million+ troy ounces of monetary gold, valued at $2.7 billion. In exchange, the IMF has offered a bunch of counterfeited funny money and debt instruments.

Pakistan has said, No thanks -- their confidence bolstered by a $1.5 billion dollar gift from Saudi Arabia.
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2015 8:06 pm
Texan politician moves to create the first state gold depository
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/polit ... 07600.html

The plan has been taken seriously, with the House and the Senate have signing off on his plan and his bill seems to be headed to Gov. Greg Abbott for consideration. House Bill 483 would let the Texas comptroller’s office establish the state’s first bullion depository at a location yet to be determined.

Interesting how Texan interests would feel better if their gold was moved from New York vaults to something right in their backyard. It would save them storage fees, and generate fees for the state. Not only would the depository be made to store Texan gold, but the bullion of any financial institutions, cities, school districts, businesses, individuals and countries.

I think it's a great idea and I hope more states follow suit. It might create more interest in the public to diversify a bit into (non counter-party risk) sources of wealth that have been respected for thousands of years. And to be honest with you, there's a lot of distrust about the 'traditional' New York banking vaults. Do they even have all the bullion originally put in there? Why do they delay or refuse to give bullion back to rightful owners? It's just fishy.

The idea for the Texan gold vault goes back to Texas Gov. Rick Perry, at least back to 2013...
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/201 ... al-reserv/

Texas Gov. Rick Perry told Glenn Beck on his radio show last week that he wants the state’s $1 billion in gold reserves back from the Federal Reserve.

Mr. Perry said his state was “in the [legislative] process” of “bringing gold that belongs to the state of Texas back into the state.”

“If we own it,” the governor said, “I will suggest to you that that’s not someone else’s determination whether we can take possession of it back or not.”


I never knew what to make of Gov. Perry, since he has rolled with some very elite people from time to time. But at least his reasoning in this example is very sound and good for Texas.
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2015 9:12 pm
German investment gold demand is off the chart

http://srsroccoreport.com/german-gold-b ... ve-to-see/

Matter-a-fact, German gold bar and coin purchases (32.2 mt) during the quarter account for more than half of total European demand (61 mt). On the other hand, the British, French and Canadians ranked the lowest in the chart taking the 5th, 6th and 7th spots respectively. What’s even more amusing, total physical gold investment from these three countries is about a tenth of German purchases.


Germany is actually buying 12 times more physical gold per capita than the United States.

Again, if we exclude the savvy gold buying Swiss, the Germans continue to be the strongest physical gold buyers in the West. Lastly, if we add up all the other Western countries total gold bar and coin demand including Switzerland, here is the result for Q1 2015:

Germany = 32.2 metric tons (45%)
Rest of West = 39.5 metric tons (55%)

Is there something the Germans know about gold that most of the folks in the West don’t?


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Bring me all the bacon and eggs you have...
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2015 10:03 pm
Being unable to afford large amounts of gold (or even small amounts) I'm stocking up on Toilet paper to use as currency once our post-apocalyptic future arrives.
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2015 10:14 pm
The USA and India are importing a lot more silver

USA
http://srsroccoreport.com/why-is-the-u- ... r-bullion/

India and the USA
http://www.silverseek.com/article/india ... pply-13413

Last year, India produced 12.1 million ounces of silver, while it imported 15 times that amount at 187 million oz. The United States performed a little better in the mining sector by producing 35 million ounces versus 163.3 million oz of silver imports.... nearly a 5 to 1 ratio.

If we combine the two... we come up with some startling results. Total silver mine supply from these two countries equals 47 million ounces compared to the staggering 350 million oz in silver imports. Basically, India and the United States import nearly half (44%) of total global silver mine supply.



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Bring me all the bacon and eggs you have...
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2015 10:18 pm
Do we lead the world in ANYTHING anymore?

C'MON!
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 06, 2015 10:18 pm
JasonNC wrote:Being unable to afford large amounts of gold (or even small amounts) I'm stocking up on Toilet paper to use as currency once our post-apocalyptic future arrives.


Hey man. Good plan! On a related note, think 'lady products'. They need a lot. Some more than others.

Also, in blasted post-WW2 Europe, cigarettes, chocolate, booze, and canned food were highly valued units of barter.
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